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First ecological cemetery where you can become a tree

First ecological cemetery where you can become a tree

Would you like to become a tree after leaving this world? This innovative, ecological and sustainable idea is already possible in the first Bios Park in the world, which is located in Quebec, Canada.

This park has an extension of land dedicated exclusively to planting trees along with the remains of loved ones.

In the last 23 years the funeral company called Bios has created new ways to help people say goodbye to their closest and loved ones, leaving aside the conventional methods that are quite expensive and unsustainable.

The creators of the Bio Urns point out that these containers are 100% biodegradable and contain a mixture of the seed of the desired tree with natural fertilizers which are combined with the remains of the loved one, be it human or pet.

Once the Bio Urn is planted under the ground, a tree emerges from this that, in addition to being a beautiful farewell process for the family, is a grain of sand to contribute to the reforestation of the planet.

The tree grows from the ashes, the urn biodegrades without leaving any trace whatsoever, and death becomes a transformation and return to life through nature "says the Bios website. "On an individual level, it's very therapeutic at a time like this. Globally, we are taking collective responsibility for much-needed planetary restoration. We are talking about thousands, if not millions, of trees planted each year”.

This idea has been distributed in more than 50 countries around the world

Although the idea is already distributed around the world, the company opened what would be the first cemetery dedicated exclusively to the planting of its Bio Urns in Quebec, Canada.

The proposal is that you can choose the plant that will germinate from the urn, you can choose between: crab apple, sugar maple, oak, gingko, lilac, hydrangea and amur maple.

We decided which tree option to offer families after consulting with the city about regulations on accepted native tree species and with the help of a gardener from our local garden center. ", they describe on their official website. "We have chosen resistant species that do not require much care and maintenance and that also grow well in our area."

According to Elise, the director of the project created in Granby: after the day of the funeral, we often see families return to visit the bodies and take care of their tree by removing damaged leaves or decorating them according to the seasons and the different holidays of the year . Several have testified that they love to see the other small trees grow around them as well. Meditation in the trees is much warmer and more natural than on a tombstone according to them.

Video: Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years. Short Film Showcase (October 2020).